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Butterfly Nature Trail Dedication

Saturday, September 15, 2012 1:00pm


Where: Canal Park-Lock 30, next to the boat launch in the Village of Macedon.

Free Music: Mystic Karma, great 60-70’s band, well known.

What to Bring: Lawn chairs and laughter.

Food: For purchase, Hot Dogs/Sausage, Chips, Water. Kiwanis Club helping with the cooking.


Face Painting; Family event; no alcohol permitted.

Money raised will go towards the Butterfly Nature trail for continuous improvements.

Come view the painted rocks done at the Summer Sidewalk Festival in June.

Please join the fun for an affordable fun day!
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Butterfly Nature Trail Dedication


Saturday, September 15, 2012             1:00pm



Where: Canal Park-Lock 30, next to the boat launch in the Village of Macedon.

Free Music: Mystic Karma, great 60-70’s band, well known.

What to Bring: Lawn chairs and laughter.

Food: For purchase, Hot Dogs/Sausage, Chips, Water.  Kiwanis Club helping with the cooking.


Face Painting; Family event; no alcohol permitted.

Money raised will go towards the Butterfly Nature trail for continuous improvements.

Come view the painted rocks done at the Summer Sidewalk Festival in June.


Please join the fun for an affordable fun day!
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An Angel in a Wheelchair



An angel in a wheelchair came to the Trail of Hope today. I volunteer at the Trail, and have witnessed so many transformations, and people finding healing and hope there. I was privileged to meet Leigh Ann Henry today, who with Jim Tuscher is what the garden is all about. When Leigh Ann and her father Rich's van pulled up to the Trail, I wasn't sure what to expect. I greeted Leigh Ann's father as he went about getting her wheelchair from the back of the van. It was very moving to see him bend down, and lovingly take her in his arms so he could pick her up, and put her in her chair. So many times we hear about a mother's devotion, but he is just as devoted to her. He was making sure she was comfortable in every way, as well as encouraging her to engage in conversation. I can only imagine the toll it is taking on his back as he continues to pick her up and carry her that way. He would take his hand, and put it by her face, and she would kiss it. I have taken care of someone for years in a wheelchair, and know it does require a very strong commitment to be there everyday and night to do everything they can't. We are sorrowful for the hopes and dreams that they had, but trying to always be positive for the life they still have. I couldn't help but reach down and hug her. I kissed her on the cheek, and she tried to do the same. We looked in each other's eyes, and I felt I could look into her soul--a beautiful angel in a wheelchair. I couldn't help it--the tears flowed down my cheeks. A woman with dreams of her own, too soon taken away. She was a nurse to be there for others, but now she has to have others wait on her. I know she is positive, and the family is trying to do everything on their own, but how wonderful it would be if the community would come together to help her get a power wheelchair. I know we all take the ability to care for ourselves for granted, but what if we could help her live a more independent life with dignity and respect, so she could have some of the freedom that we have every day. She was a nurse to be there for everyone who was in her care, and now we should be there for her. We are all angels with one wing--we can only fly embracing each other. (Luciano De Crescenzo)


Carol Kildoyle
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Green Fire at the Ohmann Theatre


Trail Works to present film on noted ecologist:

Aldo Leopold (January 11, 1887 – April 21, 1948) was an American author, scientist, ecologist, forester and environmentalist. He is best known for his book A Sand County Almanac (1949), which has sold over two million copies. He was influential in the development of modern environmental ethics and in the movement for wilderness conservation. His ethics of nature and wildlife preservation had a profound impact on the environmental movement.

Aldo Leopold’s legacy lives on today in the work of people and organizations across the nation and around the world. Green Fire is more than a biography of the great conservationist. It explores the influence of his ideas that have shaped the conservation movement as we know it today.

On Tuesday, April 24th Trial Works will show the "Green Fire" a film about the life and legacy of Aldo Leopold, at the Ohmann Theatre at 7:00 p.m. Proceeds will go toward the Forever Wild for Everyone program and other trail building projects. Mark your calendars now for this event and in the meantime - check out A Sand County Almanac as recommended reading.

Book Review, Sand County Almanac and Film Showing

submitted by Mark DeCracker, Trail Works Board Member

I just got done watching the "Green Fire" the story of Aldo Leopold. Perhaps you have never heard of Aldo Leopold, but when you have, you will realize what an impact he has had on the modern land ethic. Perhaps my love of the outdoors can be traced to my freshman year at Finger Lakes Community College. One of the books we were required to read was the Sand County Almanac, Recently while cleaning up my basement I came across a book called Wilderness Visionary. This book was about the most influential writers of the wilderness preservation over the last 180 years. There are familiar names like Henry David Thoreau and John Muir, but this list of authors also includes Aldo Leopold. After I read Wilderness Visionary I found my original copy of Sand County Almanac, which I haven't read since I was 18 years old. As I started reading I came across many places where I had underlined in the book. It all started to become clear to me where my roots where established. my love of the outdoors, wildflowers, cross country skiing, hiking and photography. You never know when a seed is planted when it is going to grow, for me it was recently with the Forever Wild for Everyone program. Little did I know that Aldo Leopold’s vision would come to fruition through my eyes today. I remember spending a weekend while in college in the Apache National Forest in Arizona up on high ridge and being in awe. On that high ridge with the wind blowing through the Ponderosa pines, little did I know on that day that I was walking in the footstep of Aldo Leopold and the "Green Fire."

On Tuesday, April 24th Trial Works will show the "Green Fire" a film about the life and legacy of Aldo Leopold, at the Ohmann Theater at 7:00 p.m. Proceeds will go toward the Forever Wild for Everyone program and other trail building projects.

When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.”

A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.”


“My favorite quote: The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, waters, plants, and animals, or collectively: the land... In short, a land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and citizen of it. It implies respect for his fellow-members, and also respect for the community as such.”

http://www.ohmanntheatre.com/

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President Keith Gardner of the North Rose Lions Club introduced Mark DeCracker at their dinner meeting March 14, 2012 at Skippers Landing. Mark is an enthusiastic, dedicated and tireless worker for the Forever Wild nature program.

The Arizona State graduate and resident of Lyons believes that all people have a right to enjoy nature. Mark presented a power point program on his current nature programs. He stated that you do not see kids playing baseball on their own anymore. In his day, the kids would be out till the dinner bell rang. A love of nature might help to change things for our young people. We want to open the outdoors to everyone so that we have future generations of nature lovers.

The Huckleberry Swamp Trail in North Rose was opened June 2011 and is a Forever Wild trail. It is a mile long boardwalk that is easily accessed by strollers and wheel chairs. Mark is currently working on a trail in Lyons which is being converted "from a dirt pile to a dream" on the current Lyons Community Center grounds. Many different groups are helping to make his dream a reality. Children have planted flowers and shrubs; Wal-Mart and Seneca Meadows have given donations; Phelps Cement has given pavers, Paul Stoep gravel, Santo Montemorando stones, Butch's Handyman Service Bobcat, Secor Lumber has donated lumber for the covered bridge. The list goes on and on.

Mark has involved the young children in planting butterfly bushes and herbs. They like getting their hands dirty. He has a YouTube presentation. The Lyons trail will be dedicated to Leann Henry and Jim Tuscher and is halfway to completion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0je4OpPMpg



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Trail of Hope under construction






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Posted: Sunday, January 1, 2012 12:00 am

Mark DeCracker and a dedicated group of volunteers are well on their way to reaching a 2011 resolution in 2012 — a Forever Wild for Everyone trail behind the Lyons Community Center.

The first Forever Wild trail was dedicated last June at Huckleberry Swamp in North Rose, a mile-long boardwalk that’s easy for even wheelchairs and baby strollers to navigate.

DeCracker said the dedication attracted about 75 people, about a third of them in wheelchairs. Given the honor of cutting the ribbon was Leigh Ann Henry of Lyons, who has been in a wheelchair since a car accident two years ago.

As the organizers counted down from 10 to cut the ribbon, Henry got so excited she cut the ribbon at 8, DeCracker said.

She also expressed that she couldn’t wait until her own trail is built — and DeCracker is happy to report that it’s well on its way in her hometown of Lyons.

What was essentially a large dirt pile right off the parking lot of the Lyons Community Center in March is being transformed into a quarter-mile long trail with gardens, a place to feed ducks and even a covered bridge.

The group’s vision is to have an educational and recreational trail filled with native species, where the young and old, ambulatory and wheelchair-bound can enjoy and learn about nature.

“We want to open the outdoors to everyone so we have it for future generations,” said DeCracker, who said the entire community has come together to make this dream a reality.

Children helped plant; Wal-Mart and Seneca Meadows gave grant donations; Diane Young created the landscape design; Phelps Cement donated pavers and landscaping cloth; Santo Montemorando and Paul Stoep gave gravel, rocks and stone dust; Brian Secor of Secor Lumber gave supplies for the covered bridge; Adam Chapin and Larry Graf offered their Bobcat and grading expertise; residents donated use of their Bobcats, Windy Hill Flower Farm and Millpond Evergreen Nursery; and the list goes on.

“I can’t say enough how the community businesses came together,” DeCracker said.

He anticipates the trail will be dedicated this May or June. Although winter is a quiet time for work — with just some landscaping planning on the horizon — the group benefited from a mild fall and was able to complete the covered bridge in late November.

DeCracker is excited about reintroducing nature to the young and old who may have lost touch with it.

“This shows you can take a semi-urban place and turn it into nature,” he said. “Nature hasn’t always been there, but you can bring it back.”

For video clips on the trails’ progress, see these YouTube clips: www.youtube.com/ watch?v=n0je4OpPMpg andwww.youtube.com/watch?v=b6no9P5NEZ0.

Porter is editor of Life by the Lakes.